Vampire Vape In Space

It’s one small step for man, one giant leap for Vampire Vape. The iconic taste of Heisenberg has been recognised worldwide and continues to reach new heights... 121,000ft above ground to be precise!

On a mission to make history, members of the marketing team here at Vampire Vape set off from our HQ in Darwen to meet the Send It into Space team. After a quick briefing and a piece to camera from the knowledgeable Chris from Send It into Space, our Heisenberg bottle was attached to the payload and positioned directly in front of the camera to ensure we captured the best view possible with an awe-inspiring backdrop.  

The trained and experienced team then filled then balloon to the correct weight using the renewable resource hydrogen, which due its lower density than air, provides the buoyancy to lift the payload through the troposphere (the lowest layer of Earth’s atmosphere) and into the stratosphere.

The payload needed to be tracked and monitored throughout the flight so two tracking systems were therefore on board the payload:

  1. A radio live tracking system that maintains a signal with our recovery team and several listening stations around the country, this is active throughout the flight and reports a coordinate position and altitude to us every 3 seconds until the payload is <500m from landing
  2. A satellite internet locator, this does not transmit a live signal during the flight and is used as a backup locator once the payload has reached the ground. This device has 99% coverage internationally, with the vast majority of the 1% ‘hole’ being in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, where our balloons will never fly.

Then it’s time for lift off! Once the balloon was at the correct capacity and the payload has successfully connected to the tracking technology, it’s all systems go. The balloon took flight and with it, our famous Heisenberg e-liquid.

On the balloon and payload’s ascent it travelled vertically between 4.5m/s and 7m/s, or 10mph and 15.6mph. At peak altitude, the balloon bursts and the payload began its descent. Most of the body of the balloon remained attached at this stage, as the balloons are designed to burst in a spiderweb pattern from the top.

Initially, the payload descended at 100-200mph. The parachute connected to the payload gradually filled as the air thickens at lower altitude, allowing it to return to earth slowly and steadily. After a 45-minute descent the team are typically ahead of the payload and in the landing area before arrival.  The team located and collected our Heisenberg within 5 minutes of it landing.